South Manchester Book Group

We're a friendly and open reading group, and we share a love of books and discussing them with other people. We meet every fortnight, but you don't have to come to them all. It's dead simple; choose a book you like the sound of, read it (or even part of it) beforehand and turn up with a few ideas and money for beer / wine / flirtinis. It's very informal, and we're quite a friendly bunch.

We normally meet at the Fletcher Moss on William Street in Didsbury around 8 pm. We can usually be found on the table with the books and flirtinis. Whilst the contagion lasts and we remain indoors we'll meet online, reading virtual books and drinking virtual flirtinis — vlirtinis if you will.

We've become rather popular recently so unfortunately aren't accepting new members just at the moment. But please drop us a line on the Contact Us form and we'll add you to our mailing list.

Our reading list, past, present, and future, appears here and a short version of what we’re reading next is here.

Thursday, 20 January 2022

Proxima — Stephen Baxter

Book cover for Proxima by Stephen Baxter Proxima in the South Manchester, Chorlton, Cheadle, Fallowfield, Burnage, Levenshulme, Heaton Moor, Heaton Mersey, Heaton Norris, Heaton Chapel, Northenden, and Didsbury book group The very far future: The Galaxy is a drifting wreck of black holes, neutron stars, chill white dwarfs. The age of star formation is long past. Yet there is life here, feeding off the energies of the stellar remnants, and there is mind, a tremendous Galaxy-spanning intelligence each of whose thoughts lasts a hundred thousand years. And this mind cradles memories of a long-gone age when a more compact universe was full of light ...

The 27th century: Proxima Centauri, an undistinguished red dwarf star, is the nearest star to our sun and the nearest to host a world, Proxima IV, habitable by humans. But Proxima IV is unlike Earth in many ways. Huddling close to the warmth, orbiting in weeks, it keeps one face to its parent star at all times. The substellar point, with the star forever overhead, is a blasted desert, and the antistellar point, its antipode, is under an ice cap in perpetual darkness. How would it be to live on such a world ?

Yuri Jones, with 1,000 others, is about to find out ...

This week's book is Proxima by Stephen Baxter and we'll not be meeting at The Fletcher Moss on William Street in Didsbury but will be meeting online — contact us for details.

No comments: